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    2 Black Marines Who Broke Racial Barriers During WWII Die Within Days of Each Other

    2 Black Marines Who Broke Racial Barriers During WWII Die Within Days of Each Other

    Two barrier-smashing Marine Corps veterans who were among the first Black men to enlist in the service died this month — within a week of each other, according to officials and local news reports.

    Cosmas Eaglin Sr. and Nathaniel “Nate” Boone joined the segregated Montford Point Marines during World War II and were honored decades later for helping break racial lines in the . They were 108 and 95 years old, respectively.

    North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said Eaglin and other Montford Point Marines set an example “that helped lead the progress toward racial equality that our country has made over the last 80 years,” according to the North Carolina Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

    Read Next: Inside the Marine Corps' Fight with Fox News over a False Gold Star Family Story

    The Bennington Banner in Vermont heralded Boone, a resident of Bennington County, as a “revered” veteran. He has a state-sanctioned day in his honor — Feb. 17 is known as Nathaniel Boone Day in Vermont.

    Montford Point was an all-Black training on the River just outside of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The camp trained almost 20,000 recruits in the 1940s after President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802 — a 1941 provision banning discrimination in the armed services.

    A year after Roosevelt's executive order, the first Black recruits arrived at Montford Point and endured dismal conditions and racism. The…

    Continue Reading This Article At Military.com

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