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    Slow Progress on Identifying Korean War Missing as North Korea Stonewalls on Searches

    Slow Progress on Identifying Korean War Missing as North Korea Stonewalls on Searches

    One by one, the relatives of troops lost in the Korean War rose to tell in heart-wrenching detail why it was still so important for them and the nation, even after more than 70 years since their loved ones went missing, to identify their remains and bring them home.

    “Danny Boy” will always be their song, said Brenda Lott, sister of Cpl. Daniel Dulin, who served with I Co., 3rd Battalion, 187th Regimental Combat Team. He was killed in action near the North Korean town of Opar-ri on Oct. 21, 1950, and is still unaccounted for, according to the Defense / Accounting Agency, or DPAA.

    “He was 18 years old” when he was lost, “and I was 6. He was my first love and my first grief,” Lott said. “Sometimes people ask, ‘Why do you keep doing this? It must be hard to keep doing this,” going to briefings and pressing for answers, she said. “I say, ‘No, it isn't hard. He's my brother.'”

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    Another who told of her family's loss was Tracy Kramer, whose uncle, Pvt. 1st Class Wayne Franklin Elliott, went missing in action against the enemy on Oct. 29, 1952, while serving with G Co., 2nd Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division.

    Kramer said her father had “no acceptance of his brother's passing,” and her mother kept sending him care packages even after the military declared he was dead. As for herself, Kramer said, “It's…

    Continue Reading This Article At Military.com

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