Friday, April 19, 2024
More
    HomeWorldVets in Formerly Redlined Neighborhoods at Higher Risk for Heart Disease, Other...

    Vets in Formerly Redlined Neighborhoods at Higher Risk for Heart Disease, Other Chronic Conditions, Study Finds

    Vets in Formerly Redlined Neighborhoods at Higher Risk for Heart Disease, Other Chronic Conditions, Study Finds

    More than 50 years after the practice of redlining was banned, veterans living in neighborhoods where previous residents had been denied home loans or other benefits have a higher incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions, according to research published last week in JAMA Network Open.

    Examining the medical records of nearly 80,000 cardiovascular patients in the Veterans Health Administration against the backdrop of historic Home Owners' Loan Corporation maps and census data, the researchers found that veterans living in neighborhoods once redlined by the federal government had a nearly 13% higher risk of death from any cause and a 15% higher risk of a major heart attack than veterans who lived in the most desirable areas as deemed by the HOLC.

    “Even nearly a century after its elimination, redlining is still adversely associated with cardiovascular events nationally,” they wrote.

    Read Next: Alabama Lawmaker Blocks Pentagon Budget Moves to Decision on Space Command Basing

    The veterans living in formerly redlined neighborhoods also had a higher incidence of smoking, obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Previous studies also have shown that those living in formerly redlined areas have worse outcomes. The researchers, led by Dr. Salil Deo, a surgeon at the Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Hospital in Cleveland, sought to determine whether there was any link…

    Continue Reading This Article At Military.com

    Stay Connected

    34,572FansLike
    4,123FollowersFollow
    1,739FollowersFollow

    Latest articles

    AlphaDog Hosting Ad

    Related articles

    1 Comment

    Comments are closed.