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    HomeWorldUK Village Marks Struggle Against US Army Racism in World War II

    UK Village Marks Struggle Against US Army Racism in World War II

    UK Village Marks Struggle Against US Army Racism in World War II

    BAMBER BRIDGE, (AP) — The village of Bamber Bridge in northwestern England is proud of the blow it struck against racism in the U.S. during World War II.

    When an all-Black truck regiment was stationed in the village, residents refused to accept the segregation ingrained in the U.S. . Ignoring pressure from British and American authorities, pubs welcomed the GIs, local women chatted and danced with them, and English soldiers drank alongside men they saw as allies in the war against fascism.

    But simmering tensions between Black soldiers and white military police exploded on June 24, 1943, when a dispute outside a pub escalated into a night of gunfire and rebellion that left Private William Crossland dead and dozens of soldiers from the truck regiment facing court martial. When Crossland's niece learned about the circumstances of her uncle's death from an Associated Press reporter, she called for a investigation to uncover exactly how he died.

    The community has chosen to focus on its stand against segregation as it commemorates the 80th anniversary of what's now known as the Battle of Bamber Bridge and America reassesses its past treatment of Black men and women in the armed forces.

    “I think maybe it's a sense of pride that there was no bigotry towards (the soldiers),” said Valerie Fell, who was just 2 in 1943 but whose family ran Ye Olde Hob Inn, the 400-year-old thatched-roof pub…

    Continue Reading This Article At Military.com

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