Why a Somali-born fighter is being honoured in Rome

In our series of letters from African journalists, Ismail Einashe looks at how some Italians are revaluating their colonial past in Africa.

Rome’s city council voted earlier this month to name a future metro station in the Italian capital in honour of Giorgio Marincola, an Italian-Somali who was a member of the Italian resistance.

He was killed at the age of 21 by withdrawing Nazi troops who opened fire at a checkpoint on 4 May 1945, two days after Germany had officially surrendered in Italy at the end of World War Two.

The station, which is currently under construction, was going to be called Amba Aradam-Ipponio – a reference to an Italian campaign in Ethiopia in 1936 when fascist forces brutally unleashed chemical weapons and committed war crimes at the infamous Battle of Amba Aradam.

Image caption

This illustration of the Battle of Amba Aradam, where mustard gas was used, appeared in La Domenica del Corriere…

Continue Reading This Article At BBC News

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