Balakot strike: Each warhead had 70-80 kg net explosive quantity

As reported earlier, it is believed that the IAF used the Israeli SPICE 2000 precision guided munition (PGM) for the task

Each warhead used by the Indian Air Force (IAF) to target buildings on the campus of the Jaish-e-Mohammad madrasa at Balakot in Pakistan on February 26 had a net explosive quantity (NEQ) of only 70-80 kg of TNT, The Indian Express has learnt. This could explain the nature and extent of damage to the buildings, as revealed by commercially available satellite images.

“There has been a lot of speculation on the quantity of explosive used to hit each of the buildings. What really matters is the NEQ or net explosive quantity of the warhead used. The warheads which we used have a NEQ of — I can’t share the exact figure — only 70-80 kg of TNT,” a top military officer told The Indian Express.

Watch: Whatever we intended to destroy, we got result, says Air Vice Marshal on IAF aerial strike

NEQ is defined as the total mass of the contained explosive substances in a warhead, without the packaging, casings and bullets. According to the US Department of Defense, NEQ includes the mass of the TNT-equivalent of all contained energetic substances in the warhead.

As reported earlier, it is believed that the IAF used the Israeli SPICE 2000 precision guided munition (PGM) for the task, which were fired from Mirage-2000 aircraft. The extent of damage to the buildings witnessed in commercially available satellite images is not consistent with…

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