Fear, Orgy & Execution in Münster: Rise and Fall of Daesh’s Medieval ‘Prototype’

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They say history is cyclical and, generally, repeats itself: over the past few years the entire world has been glued to the atrocities committed by Daesh, but it appears that a similar violent radical movement established its rule over one German city back in the 16th century.

It may seem that Daesh* has invented its own “sophisticated” means of torture and execution, yet if you look back to the 1500s it turns out that another notorious radical movement, the Anabaptists, headed by Dutchman Jan of Leiden, largely contributed to a similar reign of chaos and anarchy in the North Rhine-Westphalian city of Münster.

WATCH Daesh Prison Full of Torture Devices, Drugs Uncovered in Iraqi Tal Afar

As Jan desperately sought to create a new kingdom, his followers flooded the city, having set their own rules: Jan, their self-proclaimed king, announced that every woman of marriageable age in Münster should find a match despite the fact that the number of women exceeded that of men in the city – which led to the official endorsement of polygamy.

The adoption of polygamy prompted an attempted coup d’etat, which, in turn, laid grounds for another dramatic twist of events – Jan decided to render executions without trial acceptable, and it was done in the most brutal way – beheading. The self-proclaimed king did not even hesitate to take one of his sixteen wives to the town’s chopping block when she laughed at his luxurious…

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